How we work

Our shape is constantly changing, and as things shift we will update this page.

Working groups are collections of individuals coming together to further certain work streams or learn. 

We also run a learning course called the Systems Changers Programmme, a participatory funding initiative and a Children and Young People Inquiry. 

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Deciding

Together

Fund

Connections to people and groups with direct and personal experience of multiple complex needs

How we progress is cyclical.

We take these 5 steps to evolve together.

This is widely referred to as 'experiential learning'.

Observe

Question

Act

Plan

Reflect

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Encouraging participatory leadership...

Participatory Leadership is an approach that scales up from personal to systemic change.

It uses dialogue, facilitation and co-creation to address complex challenges. 

The following steps are a part of the '8 Breaths of Process' Model from The Art of Hosting.

This model shows how a group of people can come together in a space where each individual's views and opinions are valued equally. The results of working in this way are wise, more informed action and increased connection.

The 9 steps of the '8 Breath Model':

  1. Begin by recognising a Disturbance, Possibility or Question

  2. The Call  - a core team is asked to come together

  3. Clarify the core team's own role within the process

  4. Invite stakeholders to participate

  5. Meet to discuss the issue at hand

  6. Harvest information provided through discussion

  7. Act - practice what's been learnt through sense-making

  8. Reflect on change that has occurred

  9. Results

In between each step participants are encouraged to create space for thought and 'breath'.

This slows the process down and ensures commitment from everyone involved.

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The diagram above shows where divergence (disagreement and difference) and convergence (coming together) take place.

There is space held between the two to allow for the emergence of new ideas to occur. 

It's often tough to stay in this place as there is often a rush to make decisions. This is why it's marked 'the groan zone'.